Our Co-Founder Anna Lässer has recently joined newly founded publication Delphi – Interdisciplinary Review of Emerging Technologies, as their Associate Editor. She’s heading the Startup Digest section for Delphi and has for her first contribution taken a closer look at the whole topic of “Blockchain4Good” – interviewing three startups from Impact Hub Berlin’s network to gain deep insights on the status quo. Here’s the intro to the feature – find a link to the whole article down below!

The Startup Digest section of Delphi introduces startups and grassroots initiatives from around the world that push the boundaries of emerging technologies. Most conversations around emerging technologies are stuck in silos and are quite hyped, making it hard to understand their actual impact on businesses, society and governance. The Startup Digests aim to demystify what is happening on the ground by establishing a discourse via case studies and interviews with startups and grassroots initiatives. Each edition will take a critical look on how these movements apply emerging technologies to achieve a specific purpose – facilitating a discourse that makes the (new) thinking, the approach and potential impact become more tangible.

This first edition of the Startup Digest focuses on the nascent blockchain technology that is strongly driven by startups. These enterprises are exploring new opportunities and business models that may have the potential to transform many existing processes in business, society and governance. According to the World Economic Forum, blockchain technology can be a game-changer in how the 17 Global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are tackled: It enables a shift towards ‘cleaner and more resource-preserving decentralised solutions, to unlock natural capital, and to empower communities’ and thus incentivise new behaviour. This edition features three startups that pioneer blockchain technology, exploring new business models designed to create a positive impact.

The startups that have been sourced via the global network of Impact Hub Berlin are: (1) BenBen – land & real-estate market, Ghana,(2) Minespider – mineral supply chain, Germany and (3) SolarLux – solar energy, Thailand. Each interview will give insights on opportunities for growth, challenges and risks to reveal what is happening on the ground. Additionally, possible spill over effects to other emerging technologies will be taken into consideration.

Read the full article here!

Also, you can find the complete first issue of Delphi here.

Enjoy the read!

We are lucky here at Impact Hub Berlin to have so many interesting projects and people come through our door every day – that truly span all of the Sustainable Development Goals with their work and are making an actual impact to peoples’ lives. Jobs4refugees is certainly one such case. They are a non-profit organisation with the mission to enable refugees to rebuild their lives and to become active members of German society. As we all know, bureaucracy is no easy task, and support with this is greatly needed. So Jobs4refugees are driving integration and help people who are looking for employment realise their full potential. To find out more about the people behind the organistation, we got the team to answer a few questions! 

  1. How did jobs4refugees get started?

In summer of 2015 when over a million refugees came to Germany in a very short time, jobs4refugees founder Robert Barr also wanted to get involved and help. In the beginning, he gave German classes as a volunteer. It became clear quite quickly that finding a job is one of the most pressing issues for refugees. So two of us, equipped with an excel-spread, started speaking to refugees in a refugee-shelter, taking down their information as well as job-aspirations and simply began to cold-call potential employers – asking them whether they would be open to hiring a refugee. This approach worked surprisingly well and we decided to build a non-profit placement-agency for refugees. Thus jobs4refugees was born.

  1. What’s your mission?

Our mission is quite straight forward and given our name not very surprising: to help refugees in Germany take up work and apprenticeships. We seek to drive the labour market integration by leveling the playing field and help refugees and employers overcome the cultural, language and bureaucratic barriers and biases to a successful integration.

  1. How many people have you worked with so far?

Today jobs4refugees reaches over 21.000 refugees nationwide with the job-offers of employers we work with. We have placed over 200 refugees and reached about 1000 refugees through trainings, workshops and consultation.

  1. What does Impact Hub mean to you?

On the one hand Impact Hub is a great place to work with a great working atmosphere and enough flexibility and space to consult and meet both the refugees and employers we work with. On the other hand being part of the community is great and often creates new opportunities and ideas for our work, be it intros to employers or volunteers or getting some ‘outside’ feedback on new ideas during the community lunch in the Impact Hub.

You can find more about Jobs4refugee on their website – and huge congratulations again to Robert Barr, their CEO and Founder who recently has been awarded “Top 40 Under 40” by Capital magazine 2018, for all of his outstanding work and dedication! 🙌🏼

Every day we work hard to create a future that works for all – solving wicked problems around the the SDGs.

THE BEYOND is a series we brought to life to take you on a journey – beyond the known allies, the countries we live in, the current methods and tools, the new technologies, the digital transformation and the unicorns. Beyond the buzzwords.

We’ll be sharing insights, learnings and research from our work and from within our ecosystem. Each volume of THE BEYOND will bring you up to speed about a core topic through a series of articles and a closing event.

We want to inspire you to take a look beyond: step out of the framework, identify new opportunities, discuss the challenges of tomorrow and find solutions to create a future that works for all. We are on the transition team – we invite you to be part of it.

It’s time to explore BEYOND!

 

Our topic for Volume 1 is “The missing link: Where the support ecosystem for social entrepreneurs in Germany is failing” –   featuring articles on:

The closing event of Vol.1 happened on November 13 – we presented all our findings again and had a panel discussion with Naomi Ryland (tbd*), Prof. Florian Hoos (HEC Paris, TU Berlin), Christoph Raethke (Berlin Startup Academy), Christian Kroll (Ecosia) and a great audience. Check out pictures from the event!

> Also: Stay tuned for Volume 2, coming up in early 2019! <

 

Where to find Community for social entrepreneurs in Germany

From the past three articles, we have already established that social entrepreneurs face a specific set of challenges, including, but not limited to, finding funding, knowledge and consulting opportunities. What we haven’t looked into so far is their need for community.

While social entrepreneurship and other impact-oriented forms of work have been gaining traction over the past decade, this movement still largely consists of young and first time entrepreneurs. Especially for these rather inexperienced changemakers, knowing that someone out there has been through similar issues and challenges and made similar mistakes, can be a huge factor. Being able to actively count on the support of peers to actually solve problems at hand can be a real game changer. Being part of a community, thus, is not a “nice to have” – but rather a fundamental success factor.

In this article, we set out to highlight the main ways to join a community for social entrepreneurs in Germany – from platforms and meetups to networks and hubs.

Here are the main findings from our research:  

Among all the opportunities to connect and network we encountered, these are our top 3:

Ashoka. A global network for creators of our society who, with an entrepreneurial attitude and innovative approaches, try to solve social problems – in partnership with institutions and committed people worldwide. Ashoka played a fundamental role over the past two decades in pushing the agenda of social entrepreneurship in Germany and is therefore recognized as one of its key players.

SEND. The Network for Social Entrepreneurs and social startups in Germany, SEND e.v., promotes the visibility of social entrepreneurs* and their solutions to the public. Having been part of Bundesverband Deutsche Startups e.V., it was founded as an organization in its own right in 2017.

Impact Hub. As the largest network of social innovators worldwide founded 2005 in London, Impact Hub focuses on building entrepreneurial communities for impact at scale. Impact Hubs around the world are home to the innovators, the dreamers and the entrepreneurs who are creating tangible solutions to the world’s most pressing issues. In Germany there are Impact Hubs in Berlin, Munich, Dresden and the Ruhr Area.

Overall, Germany seems well, but not great when it comes to the topic of Community. While the networks may seem hustling & bustling in the major cities, everything further away is rather silent – and even within the bigger cities, it is still hardly possible to satisfy the very diverse needs of social entrepreneurs. However, this is a topic that could move forward quickly: According to the Global Impact Report 2018 – which surveyed social entrepreneurs from 71 Impact Hubs around the globe – 84% had the most urgent need to “feel part of a larger community and network”. This is a higher number than the need for funding (45%), and the need for skill development (70%). We can imagine that private entities that have been trying to satisfy this desire for community, will step up their game  – and new organizations will try to thicken the web.

When it comes to social entrepreneurship and getting your sustainable business started, funding is, of course, one of the main concerns. In 2017 the international Impact Hub network (15.000 members in over 100 countries) conducted a Global Members Survey enquiring after the support needs of social entrepreneurs: unsurprisingly, it turned out that 45% of the Members “sought support in obtaining financial capital and investment” (Global Impact Report 2018).

 

Click here to see a map of all social founded ecosystems in Germany

 

> Also read our other articles of volume 1 on:

Please let us know if there are any great offerings we have missed and give us your input!

 

This article is part of our THE BEYOND series – a series we brought to life to take you on a journey beyond the known allies, the countries we live in, the current methods and tools, the new technologies, the digital transformation and the unicorns. Beyond the buzzwords.

We’ll be sharing insights, learnings and research from our work and from within our ecosystem. Each volume of THE BEYOND will bring you up to speed about a core topic through a series of articles and a closing event. We want to inspire you to take a look beyond: step out of the framework, identify new opportunities, discuss the challenges of tomorrow and find solutions to create a future that works for all. We are on the transition team – we invite you to be part of it.

It’s time to explore BEYOND!


Where to find knowledge for social entrepreneurs in Germany

For those who want to drive social change through business, knowledge and education are as essential as in every other sector. Research, reports, news, guides, practical information, university courses: for a normal entrepreneur, these are a given. Open a search tab and browse through endless sources, read any business journal, or attend a management seminar – even online and free of charge: you will be able to obtain a wealth of information that will teach you the business fundamentals. The question is – do social entrepreneurs enjoy the same abundance of knowledge resources?

While the basis for all sorts of entrepreneurs are roughly the same, as we have already discussed in the previous two articles on Funding and Consultancy, social entrepreneurs differ in their objectives, legal status, funding hurdles – hence also in their knowledge requirements.

In this article, we offer an overview of what sources of knowledge are available in Germany, from research to reports and platforms.

Three main findings from our research are:

 

Here are our must-go-to entities if you are looking for knowledge sources in Germany:

BMWi. In the past few years, the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy has published reports on the topic of social entrepreneurship, ranging from a practical guide with tips and pointers to an insight into the challenges and scaling processes for SEs. The website existenzgruender.de offers a number of tools, from financing and support links to procedures and financial and legal status information for SEs. Available for download on this platform are also a sustainable business canvas, reports, and practical guides for SEs.

Tbd*. A digital hub that supports those who are determined to make a career out of changing the world. Here people can find a job, hire the right team, discover workshops and courses, locate funding opportunities, connect with mission-driven companies, share best practices, or learn from others who are using their careers to make an impact.

SEA. The Social Entrepreneurship Academy is an initiative of Munich’s public universities and specializes in education for societal change. The SEA:mooc “Enabling Entrepreneurs to shape a better world” is open the everyone and designed to cater to future social entrepreneurs, delivering basic knowledge, methods and tools.

There are also other great courses for social entrepreneurs like the Changemaker MOOC by the University of Kiel and the Copenhagen Business School course offered on the Coursera platform. For later stage and especially with regards to investment readiness & social finance, the Social Finance Academy by Germany based Roots for Impact is a great resource.

One fact becomes quite obvious to us: There is a real abundance of reports, materials and courses out there – but the vast majority is provided in English. All things considered, even though the quantity of information material in German may not be huge, the quality of what is available is fairly good. This can certainly be considered a valuable asset to paving the way towards a more established social entrepreneurship sector.

 

> Also read our other articles of volume 1 on:

Please let us know if there are any great offerings we have missed and give us your input!

This article is part of our THE BEYOND series – a series we brought to life to take you on a journey beyond the known allies, the countries we live in, the current methods and tools, the new technologies, the digital transformation and the unicorns. Beyond the buzzwords.

We’ll be sharing insights, learnings and research from our work and from within our ecosystem. Each volume of THE BEYOND will bring you up to speed about a core topic through a series of articles and a closing event. We want to inspire you to take a look beyond: step out of the framework, identify new opportunities, discuss the challenges of tomorrow and find solutions to create a future that works for all. We are on the transition team – we invite you to be part of it.

It’s time to explore BEYOND!


Where to find consultancy for social entrepreneurs in Germany

 

Limited understanding of social entrepreneurship and the value it generates can, on occasion, cause business environments to be less than favourable for social entrepreneurs. Given that in addition to profit they (we) have to worry about the impact on people and the planet, this additional complexity means that social entrepreneurs will often have to be more tenacious than other entrepreneurs. They will need to be equipped with a notable set of resources and capabilities, also taking into consideration that the act of accessing capital is much more difficult for them (for more on this check the first article of this series).

While it is undoubtedly true that finding funding can be a big challenge – to gain access to it, social entrepreneurs will need to be able to build a strong, convincing case for their business ideas. To do so, coaching and training around business models, legal and regulatory frameworks, access to markets, and many more topics are key. As a matter of fact, the Global Impact Report 2018 – which surveyed social entrepreneurs from 71 Impact Hubs around the globe – found that while 45% of members look for funding opportunities, 52% of them feel the need to learn how to start a project or a venture, 70% are interested in developing their skills and capabilities, and 73% are seeking connections to advisors and experts.

In this article, we want to offer an overview of what is available in Germany when it comes to actually coaching social entrepreneurs on how to set up a social business – who are the key supporters and what forms of assistance are available.

Three main findings from our research are:

 

 

 

Here are our must-go-to entities if you are looking for formation and consultancy opportunities:

Social Impact Labs. Part of Social Impact’s work is focused on supporting early-stage social entrepreneurs via their Social Impact Labs in 7 cities across Germany. Social startups receive scholarships and qualification programs via various programs like Social Impact Start, which typically include professional counselling, coaching, networking, workshops, and coworking jobs.

Investment Ready Program. Investment Ready is a unique 4-month program for entrepreneurs which runs out of Amsterdam, Munich and Vienna. The aim is to support the creation of scalable solutions to societal problems. A cohort of around 15 selected ventures systematically works on their business strategy and builds an attractive investment case. Participants will work with experienced mentors, content experts, investors and powerful business tools.

Project Together. Project Together supports young social entrepreneurs from the early phase of their ideas, through a coaching program and an active community of founders and experts. They specifically work to support the achievement of the UN Goals for Sustainable Development.

Impact Hub. As part of the biggest global network of social innovators, Impact Hubs provides access to a global community, training and peer to peer support, workspaces, lectures and a variety of incubation and acceleration programs. In Germany there are Impact Hubs in Berlin, Munich, Dresden and the Ruhr Area.

All in all, Germany has a number of formation & consultancy programs targeting social entrepreneurs. Nonetheless, in terms of their reach and offering they are still nowhere close to what is at disposal for other entrepreneurs, especially those in the tech space. Even if the regulatory framework and the business environment should become more welcoming towards social entrepreneurs, their challenges still remain quite unique. Thus providing tailored support will be of growing importance to pave the way into the mainstream for social entrepreneurship.

> Also read our other articles of volume 1 on:


Please let us know if there is a great offering we have missed and give us your input to comms@impacthub.berlin


This article is part of our THE BEYOND series – a series we brought to life to take you on a journey beyond the known allies, the countries we live in, the current methods and tools, the new technologies, the digital transformation and the unicorns. Beyond the buzzwords.

We’ll be sharing insights, learnings and research from our work and from within our ecosystem. Each volume of THE BEYOND will bring you up to speed about a core topic through a series of articles and a closing event. We want to inspire you to take a look beyond: step out of the framework, identify new opportunities, discuss the challenges of tomorrow and find solutions to create a future that works for all. We are on the transition team – we invite you to be part of it.

 

It’s time to explore BEYOND!


Where to find funding for social entrepreneurs in Germany

When it comes to social entrepreneurship and getting your sustainable business started, funding is of course one of the main concerns. In 2017 the international Impact Hub network (15.000 members in over 100 countries) conducted a Global Members Survey enquiring after the support needs of social entrepreneurs: unsurprisingly, it turned out that 45% of the Members “sought support in obtaining financial capital and investment” (Global Impact Report 2018).

In this article we highlight the most important sources of funding available for social entrepreneurs in Germany. This can come in the form of awards, prize money, or investment (such as crowdfunding and by VCs).  

Three main findings from our research are:

While the opportunities are numerous, we pre-selected 3 must-go-to entities if you are looking for funding:

Ananda Impact Fund and BonVenture. Two of the leading venture capital investors for impact enterprises and social change in Europe, supporting companies that combine humanity and profitability and contribute sustainably to the resolution of concrete social and ecological problems.

FASE. The “Financing Agency for Social Entrepreneurship” connects social entrepreneurs and investors in order to maximize the social impact of outstanding projects through growth financing. Their main impact themes are education, inclusion, ageing population, long-term unemployment, health and sustainable consumption, but they remain open to other high-impact areas, too.

Google Impact Challenge. Targeting both local and broader projects, the challenge supports ideas that can improve our society through the help of technology – whether with an app, website or something completely different. Winners receive free training and prizes in the value of 20.000 €, 250.000 € and even 500.000 €.

For the moment, we can conclude that while Germany is certainly not barren land when it comes to funding opportunities for social entrepreneurs – it still has some steps to go. Moreover, with neighboring France pouring millions from public and private money into social innovation businesses, we are somewhat left with a feeling of that what has (arguably) been good until now, will not be enough in the future.

If sustainable businesses want to be a standard in the future, Germany must indisputably step up its game – ideally paving the way for support solutions where private entities work hand in hand with governmental ones.

>> 3 more articles for Volume 1 coming up! Topics will be consultancy, knowledge and connections – check back here again.

Please let us know if there are any great offerings we have missed and give us your input!

 

This article is part of our THE BEYOND series – a series we brought to life to take you on a journey beyond the known allies, the countries we live in, the current methods and tools, the new technologies, the digital transformation and the unicorns. Beyond the buzzwords.

We’ll be sharing insights, learnings and research from our work and from within our ecosystem. Each volume of THE BEYOND will bring you up to speed about a core topic through a series of articles and a closing event. We want to inspire you to take a look beyond: step out of the framework, identify new opportunities, discuss the challenges of tomorrow and find solutions to create a future that works for all. We are on the transition team – we invite you to be part of it.

It’s time to explore BEYOND!

Impact Hub is not just a co-working space, a consultancy for social entrepreneurs, or a place to hold events – it’s primarily a community where people who have like-minded ideas about how the world should work can come together in a safe space. Naturally to launch Impact Hub Berlin’s themed communities for social impact — Tribes — we spoke to our home-grown freelance collective, K-Tiv. Formed around four creative professionals, K-Tiv is the Berlin-based Storytelling & Design Tribe. Read on for their story and stay tuned to learn about our other Tribes!

1. How did K-Tiv get started?

It started as many Impact Hub collaborations do — we all got to know each other over the weekly Community Lunch, Kaffee & Kuchen, and Winedown events! We were individual freelancers with the desire to collaborate on creative projects that advance social and environmental causes, as well as to enjoy the excitement and new ideas that come from being part of a team. As time went on and other members needed our support in design and storytelling, we also by chance found ourselves working on the same projects together; our first, albeit accidental collaborations. It soon became clear that we worked well together, and realising that we could together take on bigger projects with more of an impact was the catalyst for the foundation of K-Tiv.

2. What’s your aim as a group?

As a collective of independent freelancers, the aim was never to act as an established agency with clients on the books but instead to offer the collective skills of experienced and independent freelancers in solving distinct storytelling and design challenges for Impact Hub members and affiliates, alongside our individual projects. Through this, we aim to support the efforts of Berlin-based and international organisations and enterprises with whom our values align, by offering our diverse and complementary expertise: Pauline and Michael are masters of the universe of images; Aimie and I, the words’ world.

3. How has it been working so far? And what has been your biggest impact?

It’s already been a wonderful ride! We’ve so far together worked on projects ranging from designing the physical and online marketing materials of a fair fashion start-up to bringing an e-book on behavioural change for entrepreneurs to life, and we already have some new, intriguing possibilities in the works.

But the project with the biggest influence so far has to be the first ever Impact Hub Global Impact Report, which we created from scratch in collaboration with the network’s communications team. The chance to think together about how to tell the story of Impact Hub’s growth, its day-to-day work with social entrepreneurs around the world and its future — as well as to further shape its visual identity — and then see this echo internationally … That’s exactly what we aim to do!

4. What does Impact Hub mean to you?

A lot. As independent freelancers, we chose to join Impact Hub seeking for a dynamic community to be inspired by, but also to collaborate with in supporting projects which have a socio-environmental focus. While it’s true that we’ve been able to grow our individual and collective changemaking careers through the connections, collaborations  and knowledge we’ve found here, what was perhaps more important was the community we found: knowing that you have a place where everyone is in the same boat, where you can help and be helped, and where you will eat copious amounts of cake alongside lovely people!

5. Where do you see K-Tiv’s future?

We hope to build on what we’ve achieved so far and continue to help shape stories that deserve to be discovered, as the need to transition to a sustainable and fair society is getting more urgent by the day. It’s impossible to tell what the future will hold — especially as freelancers! — but along with our other freelance partners, we’re looking forward to bringing our creativity to the community and help them to communicate better.

Joe Dodgshun, for K-Tiv

It’s happening: Die Digital Imagination Challenge

Inspirierende Begegnungen, intensive Sessions und eine gemeinsame Motivation, um Veränderung in der Gesellschaft zu bewirken – die zweite Runde der Digital Imagination Challenge ist in vollem Gange und das Support Programm hat mit einem zweitägigen Bootcamp in der Mozilla Foundation begonnen.

Die Digital Imagination Challenge ist ein Innovationswettbewerb, der von Unitymedia initiiert wurde, einem der größten Kabelnetzbetreiber Deutschlands. Mit diesem außergewöhnlichen Programm unterstützt der Konzern Start-ups und Initiativen, die mit Hilfe von Technologien Barrieren im Alltag für Menschen mit Behinderungen minimieren, ob zu Hause, am Arbeitsplatz oder in der Freizeit. Mit dieser einzigartigen Challenge möchten wir gleichzeitig für die Bedarfe von behinderten Menschen sensibilisieren und so auf die Notwendigkeit einer inklusiveren Gesellschaft hinweisen.

Bootcamp zur 2. Digital Imagination Challenge
++ am 17.09.2018 in Berlin (Berlin).
(c) Andi Weiland | Gesellschaftsbilder.de

Das Besondere an diesem Programm zeigt sich gerade in Momenten wie dem Bootcamp – wenn Excel-Listen zum Leben erwachen und sich in Menschen mit unglaublichen Ambitionen verwandeln, die alles daran setzen, bahnbrechende Ideen zu verwirklichen, die den Alltag von Blinden, Gehörlosen oder anders eingeschränkten Menschen zu erleichtern.

Bootcamp zur 2. Digital Imagination Challenge
++ am 17.09.2018 in Berlin (Berlin).
(c) Andi Weiland | Gesellschaftsbilder.de

Diese Innovateure brauchen Unterstützung bei ihren Konzepten und wie sie andere dafür begeistern können. Im Bootcamp durchliefen die Teilnehmer verschiedene Workshops – von Methoden der Wirkungslogik, dem Lean Canvas oder einem Pitch-Training, alles war dabei, was den Teams dabei hilft, ihre Lösungen strukturiert weiter zu entwickeln und auf die nächste Stufe zu bringen. Wir danken Unitymedia, die das Programm ermöglichen und Sozialhelden, die bei der Umsetzung und kritischem Feedback zur Seite stehen.

Nach diesem intensiven Zweitagesworkshop bekommen die Teams nun individuelles Business-Coaching und Pitch-Training, um ihre Lösungen schließlich einer Jury vorzustellen, die am 22. November 2018 in Berlin stattfinden wird. Hier winken den Teams bis zu € 20.000 Preisgeld und ein Mentoren-Programm mit Managern von Unitymedia. Stay tuned!

UnitymediaSozialhelden & Impact Hub Berlin.

Dieser Blogpost wurde von Clara Niedt und Sascha Stremming verfasst.

 

– English –

It’s happening: The Digital Imagination Challenge

Inspiring encounters, intense sessions and a common motivation to make a change in society – the second round of the Digital Imagination Challenge is in full swing and the support program has kicked off with a two-day boot camp at the Mozilla Foundation.

The Digital Imagination Challenge is an innovation competition initiated by Unitymedia, one of Germany’s largest cable network operators. With this extraordinary program, the Group supports start-ups and initiatives that use technology to minimize barriers in everyday life for people with disabilities, whether at home, at work or in their leisure time. With this unique challenge, Unitymedia also wants to raise awareness of the needs of people with disabilities and highlight the need for a more inclusive society.

Bootcamp zur 2. Digital Imagination Challenge
++ am 17.09.2018 in Berlin (Berlin).
(c) Andi Weiland | Gesellschaftsbilder.de

What’s special about this program is moments like the boot camp – when Excel lists come to life and turn into people with incredible ambitions, who do everything they can to realize groundbreaking ideas that make the daily lives of the blind, deaf, or otherwise limited people easier.

Bootcamp zur 2. Digital Imagination Challenge
++ am 17.09.2018 in Berlin (Berlin).
(c) Andi Weiland | Gesellschaftsbilder.de

These innovators need support with their concepts and how to get others excited about them. At the Bootcamp, the participants went through various workshops – from impact logic methods, lean canvas or pitch training – everything was there to help the teams develop their solutions in a structured way and take them to the next level. We thank Unitymedia for making the program possible and Sozialhelden for helping with the implementation and critical feedback.

After this intensive two-day workshop, the teams now receive individual business coaching and pitch training to eventually present their solutions to a jury that will take place on 22nd November 2018 in Berlin. Here the teams can win up to € 20,000 in prize money and a mentoring programme with managers from Unitymedia. Stay tuned!

From UnitymediaSozialhelden and Impact Hub Berlin.

This blog post was written by Clara Niedt and Sascha Stremming.

 

 

With many new techniques on “how to work” entering our radar, SCRUM is not just a buzz word. It brings transparency and coordination to a team – with structures and techniques all stakeholders can benefit from. Anton Skornyakov has set out on his mission to bring SCRUM to NGO’s, pro-bono. He recently delivered an inspiring workshop here at Impact Hub Berlin – providing the participants with a deep understanding of the Scrum framework using interactive tasks. The group had the opportunity to experience the different aspects of agile working and to immediately apply what they had learned. We grabbed Anton for a quick interview to find out more about SCRUM and his workshops – read on:

1. What is SCRUM Training for NGO’s? 

Scrum is a framework that helps you organise the work of many people in environments with many uncertainties. Our typical work context is giving Scrum training and coaching mostly for software companies. However, Scrum isn’t confined to this area; it is also being applied successfully in sales, marketing, hardware, organisational change and other contexts.

Scrum is not only a collection of practices that you need to follow – if applied, Scrum encourages a team to use self-organisation and creates a sometimes rather painful transparency about what is being achieved and how it is happening. We believe that especially non-profits can benefit strongly from using a more self-organised and transparent working process, since their goals are often highly motivating for all stakeholders involved.

With our pro-bono trainings we want to support the non-profit community – learning about their day-to-day problems and then figure out together how we can apply Scrum in an NGO context to support their needs.

 

2. What’s your mission?

We believe that agility of an organisation is another world for aliveness of the organisation. We want to help creating such alive and vital working environments – where people can show up with their full selves while effectively collaborating on common goals. We believe that the tools, principles and practices from the Agile and Scrum world are very helpful for this.

3. What does Impact Hub mean to you?

First, Impact Hub is one of those organisations that is a place for people with their full selves while achieving truly world-changing goals. Second, for us Impact Hub Berlin was the perfect partner to organise such a training with. You have a great network within the NGO world and are regularly supporting them already. Thank you!

4. What are your future plans?

This first training here was great. All participants really liked it, we were able to really go into some details around some of the participants organisations. Also, some of them already told us they want to share their learnings and with their co-workers, which is great! We are planing to do this kind of pro-bono training again in beginning of 2019, so stay tuned.

Keep your eyes open for more classes with Anton here at Agile.coach!